Listen to artist THEASTER GATES as he talks about his efforts to help revive a community in Chicago.

Click on the Tulsa Development Authority sector plans for two areas in NORTH TULSA and read the current info.

Take a look at the french city of Boulogne-Billancourt ... and imagine.  

"...often those people who are passionate about a place are disconnected from the resources necessary to make cool things happen..." 

DR. ALICIA ODEWALE

An artist who wants to help chronically underserved communities survive...has a few things to say about how to start where we are with what we have to build and rebuild our cities.

OVERSERVE

EDUCATION COMMITTEE
The Education Committee works to develop resources to educate Tulsans, Oklahomans and the nation about the events of 1921 and Historic Greenwood District. 
Committee Chair: Hannibal Johnson

 

TOURISM COMMITTEE
The Tourism Committee works to attract more people to the Historic Greenwood District for an educational and cultural experience.
Committee Chair: Brandon Oldham 

RECONCILIATION COMMITTEE
The Reconciliation Committee seeks to increase dialogue and engagement to improve race relations throughout Tulsa. 
Committee Chair: Glenda Love

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NANCY RANDOLPH DAVIS

think

THEASTER GATES

DERRICK MINTER got an awful lot done in his short life.


Scroll below to read more about this Native North Tulsa and ALVIN AILEY dancer and his impact on the future of dance.

ROAD TRIP

1921 TULSA RACE MASSACRE COMMITTEES

CASHA HALL

STREETCARS OLD AND NEW

OKLAHOMA CITY's new STREETCAR

...at left, Tulsa's old street car (trolley) winds through GREENWOOD.


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE
The Economic Development Committee seeks to  revive Black Wall Street by empowering entrepreneurs by partnering with local and national organizations to develop entrepreneurial programming and attract minority-owned businesses to Greenwood.
Committee Chair: Maggie Yar

Click on Image to Read Plan

The Best Place On Earth

Click on Image to Read Plan

The last time we tried to reach Tulsa BTW grad, Dr. Alicia Odewale, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at The University of Tulsa, she was away, busy on a project in the Middle East.


Now, Dr. Odewale and Dr. Parker VanValkenburgh, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Brown University, are directing a project on behalf of the 1921-2021 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission.   

Mapping Historical Trauma in Tulsa from 1921-2021 is their "multi-year project bringing together digital mapping, collaborative archaeological excavation, local exhibit development, and public presentation of research results, we hope to create new, critical sites of memory for Tulsans to connect to this dark moment in our shared history and consider its legacies and echoes in the present day,” according to Dr. Odewale (on TU's website).

Preserving the memory of Tulsa’s historically black Greenwood District while highlighting the multitude of ongoing resurgence efforts on behalf of Tulsa’s resilient North Tulsa community is not only about investigating the race massacre but also entails reflecting on the enterprising spirit of Black Wall Street that endures. First, Odewale and VanValkenburgh will work with TU graduate students to develop the Greenwood Centennial Resource Collection (GCRC), a public database with digitized archival material that will centralize data from university and state archives. “We want to pull together the once scattered information about 1921 and the decades that followed into one resource and place this searchable, online tool in the hands of students, community members, future researchers and anyone interested in learning more about this history 100 years in the making,” she said.

In stage two, they will generate a Greenwood historical geographic information system (GIS) website, a map-based online portal designed to enable users to visualize Greenwood before and after the massacre.

With the help of Oklahoma Archaeological Survey geophysical experts, Odewale and VanValkenburgh will conduct surveys and select key Greenwood District excavation sites. During the centennial year 2021, the public will be able to roll up their sleeves and join them in the trenches as they recover footprints of Black Wall Street’s past. Expect to see students from surrounding universities and Tulsa Public Schools alongside descendants and community leaders joining this six-week excavation to complement coursework on Oklahoma history. “This is not only a free invitation to take part in making history in Tulsa, but this is also a chance for anyone who is interested to join in the process of discovery and learn about the role archaeology can play in our communities,” Odewale said.

After the excavations, an exhibit planned for installation in the newly renovated and expanded Greenwood Cultural Center facility will feature a presentation of new digital resource tools along with any recovered archaeological material from Greenwood sites. “We will host an opening day gallery talk to provide an overview of the project and results,” she added. If any additional artifacts are recovered, they will be held in TU’s Historical Archaeology and Heritage Studies Laboratory and remain open to the public.

BUILDING DESIGN + CONSTRUCTION magazine calls Theaster Gates the Real Estate Artist.

A few years ago, the Chicago artist had an epiphany...it's time for art to be bigger, do more.  And, it's hard to get bigger than using your city as your canvas.  Gates decided to start at home, a community called Grand Crossing. Buying ever larger spaces, renovating them to create, hold and promote art and art education, he began gathering friends and investors, building momentum to change boarded up, crumbling structures into the kinds of places every community deserves.


Inspiring, encouraging, and empowering neighborhood residents to lead the positive transformation of their communities

ARTS BANK

Grand Crossing, 1902

Just Sayin'

THERE'S ONE LOGICAL RESPONSE TO REVITALIZING AMERICA'S CHRONICALLY UNDERSERVED CITIES, TOWNS & COMMUNITIES

the ART BANK

IN A DEMOCRACY THERE ARE NO MINORITIES.   ONE PERSON, ONE VOTE     IN A REPUBLIC THERE ARE ONLY NEIGHBORS.     ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL

At Jorns Hall on the Stillwater campus of Oklahoma State University, a statue honoring NANCY RANDOLPH DAVIS, the first African American student to graduate from OSU now stands...dedicated by OSU President Burns Hargis, OSU VP of Institutional Diversity, Dr. Jason Kirksey and Dean of the OSU College of Human Services, Dr. Stephan Wilson and ushered into the Orange Nation by OSU Nutritional Sciences student Jasmin Marks.


BTW

NEWSCULTURESPORTS from the Center of the Universe

BOULOGNE-BILLANCOURT is one example of a city with a population about the size of NORTH TULSA (the northern third of Tulsa/north of Admiral). Take a look at this city in France embracing its youth culture to move ahead.

WHERE'S THE FUNDING FOR THE PRESERVATION OF HISTORICALLY AFRICAN AMERICAN TOWNS & COMMUNITIES?

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PRESERVING GREENWOOD

ARTS & CULTURE COMMITTEE
The Arts & Culture Committee proposes programs and initiatives consistent with enhancing the artistic appeal throughout theHistoric Greenwood District.
Committee Chair: Jeff Van-Hanken

Tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of historically African American inner cities, towns and communities in the United States have, for centuries, shared all the aspirations for growth and development found in all American places.  However, as for small towns and cities, everywhere, jockeying for federal, state and local dollars is a crowded and exhausting enterprise in America's lotto system of government where everyone pays, but, only the squeakiest wheels, however manifested, get sufficient oil. 


And, that's not even the news that gets us down most.  

When most American cities/communities began, including Greenwood/North Tulsa, it seems, starting a business, building a home, funding schools and other institutions, though not a piece of cake, weren't the financially prohibitive exercises this generation of communities has inherited. 


But, maybe that's just our imagination.


As late as 1959, a young Berry Gordy borrowed $800 from family and started MOTOWN. However, $800 in 1959, was serious money.   According to CPI's Inflation Calculator, in purchasing power, $800 in 1959 is equivalent to over $7,000 today.


The average start-up cost for a small business today, according to the US Small Administration should include:


Office space
Equipment and supplies
Communications
Utilities
Licenses and permits
Insurance
Lawyer and accountant
Inventory
Employee salaries
Advertising and marketing
Market research
Printed marketing materials
Making a website


All still doable in Gordy's 1959 range. 


According to Business News Daily, the average startup cost for a "micro-business" is $2,000 to $5,000, today.


So, let's dream.


What are the solutions being suggested for financing a community's dream today? 


1. Incorporation    

    Incorporation as a town/municipality allows an area the autonomy to elect its own officials and directly deal with state and      federal government.


2. Conservancy 

Conservancies are organizations set up to help preserve nature, historic parks, anything, a place or even  an idea of particular interest to certain groups. Former First Lady Jackie Kennedy Onassis championed the preservation of Grand Central Station in New York. Today, Grand Central Terminal continues to thrive through the New York Landmarks Conservancy.  Fred Jones, Editor of The Oklahoma Eagle suggests this kind of preservation effort in his article, Is Greenwood At The Crossroads or Crosshairs?   

3. CICs  

Community Investment Corporations   This is our term for corporations who, as business practice, invest a portion of profits in local communities and other causes. The outerwear company, Patagonia, and retailer, The Gap, have been known to follow this type of business model over the years.


4. Reparations

​    A new "Marshall Plan" is being suggested for everywhere from Latin America to Palestine as answers to solving many of

    America's problems.  Reparations can best be explained as a kind of "Marshall Plan" for Americans who've experienced

   devastating losses through violence, decades of neglect or both. 


More often thought of as relief for individuals, but, the United States House of Representatives has begun to look at the collective harm done to African Americans as a group.  Reparations could become, as the House has stated to "address the  fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the United States and the 13 American colonies between 1619 and 1865 and to establish a commission to study and consider a national apology and proposal for reparations for the institution of slavery, its subsequent de jure and de facto racial and economic discrimination against African-Americans, and the impact of these forces on living African-Americans, to make recommendations to the Congress on appropriate remedies, and for other purposes."